Short and Up

My latest hike. A new one for me I had never been. All I knew was that it was steep.


I can never get stronger if I don’t continue to challenge myself.

Amy from Human Playground, Breaking the Pain Barrier

I heard this statement while writing this post and liked it. As a hiker, I hope I learn from this statement to conquer fears and weaknesses to make myself more vital to do these incredible hikes.

Up we go.


Then more upward we go.


Whew! We made it, and the amazing view from the top. It was worth the workout.


We stopped off at the fish pond when we got down. What a peaceful spot to cool down.

A Beautiful Waterfall

I’ve been pokey with posting my adventures. A couple of weeks ago, I went on a hike to the beautiful Lulumahu Falls with my cousin “E” and friend “L”. This was my first time on this trail; I didn’t know what to expect.


FYI: this is a permitted hike, here’s the link for where to get the permit.


We started out early, it was slightly drizzling. I was prepared for wetness and mosquitoes, wearing long pants and my trusty insect repellent [Natrapel Wipes, 20% Picaridin, no deet]. “L” had been to this hike before but did say she and her daughters did get a little lost. We started out confident and prepared.

one of the several stream crossings

We follow the pink ribbons past a stream and a grove of yellow ginger in bloom. The beautiful scent greets you as you come upon the ginger plants.


What comes with a wet trail? Many fungi of all different types. They look so beautiful, I’m sure they are all inedible. I thought of trying to look for elephant ear fungus, but the waterfall was calling me.


The important stream crossing

Biggest stream crossing

If we only knew this, stream crossing would be an essential section of our hike. We have been following the pink ribbons till this point. My cousin “E” said there were also pink ribbons with black polka dots. But at that moment of the hike, I didn’t see them at that point. We saw a pink ribbon across the stream. We went right and crossed the stream. From that point, we continued to follow the pink ribbons. At some point, we started seeing pink and yellow ribbons, some very hard to find, and large sections with no ribbons. We kind of e we were getting lost, and “E” decided to leave breadcrumbs so we could find our way back. Thinking about it now, we should have turned around at that point. But we still felt like we were on the right track and could hear the stream.

E's breadcrumb
E’s breadcrumb

I don’t know how long we continued on, but we were lost. Somehow, we made our way back, without using ribbons (we couldn’t find them anymore), to the before the large stream crossing. We meet two hikers returning from the falls, who told us to follow the stream and look out for the pink ribbons with the black dots.

Our mistake was to cross the stream and continue straight instead of following the stream. We made up to the waterfall with a few more stream crossings and boulder scrambles, always looking out for those pink with black dot ribbons.


Lesson Learned: if waterproof boots fill with water, it takes a while to drain.


boots in the stream
me and my stick vs boulders and the stream

Now on the right track, I started taking pictures of the hike. This hike is at the base of the Ko’olau mountain, right before the Pali lookout. And it must get more than its share of rain. Everything is lush and green. Here are some things I saw going up to the falls.

We made it!

Walking up to the falls, you never have it in full view; you either are below it or scrambling over boulders, but once you walk around the last grouping of boulders, this tall and mighty waterfall comes into view. Wow! What a beauty! Not that I want to get lost (one plus, I did get a workout), but this beautiful waterfall is made up for our extra stroll through the woods. We were soaking wet from the sweat and humidity of the day and all smiles that we had made it.

Happy smiles! Left to right: “L”, “E”, and me

Fav Pic: Arches NP

Haha. This is one of the few pictures Oat took of me that can’t see my double chin or the super roundness of my face. Whenever he took a picture of me, I always said, “make me look skinny.” This one may not be skinny, but it’s much better than most others.

Going through these photos has me dreaming of a vacation, like one’s Oat and I took many years ago. Covid has stopped my adventuring for a while.

One of many arches to see.

My Arches trip was in 2009, part of a triple park tour: Yellowstone, Grand Teton, and Arches. There was lots of driving, beautiful mountains, and an abundance of wildlife. The parks were great, but the rock formations at Arches were spectacular. Making me want to go and visit again.

What I would do differently

Don’t go to Moab in July, too hot. There is so much to do outside but visiting in the middle of summer wasn’t the best idea. We went out by six, explored for lunch, and spent the afternoon resting in the ac of the hotel room. In the late afternoon, we would go out for more exploring and dinner. Not a bad use of time, but I would like to be out on the trail between 7-8 and come back to the room around 4ish to relax and shower before dinner.


Spend more time in the area. A two-week triple park tour was not enough time to explore Moab. Next time, I’ll want to spend at least a week in Arches the places we didn’t have to see on my last trip.

Be brave. I’m not really afraid of height but on this trip, heights seem to bother me. I was a bit apprehensive when scrambling over the large boulders. And the slopping area by the slopping made me very nervous, that I didn’t walk up to it. I did feel very disappointed. I hope on my next trip I will be able to summon up the courage to do it.

The Delicate Arch from afar

What I would do again

I most definitely would do the Fiery Furnace guided hike with park ranger again. We hike through narrow canyons and scrambled over boulders with the ranger leading the way and pointing out the interesting rock formations and the hows and whys they were formed. I also really like being lead so I could concentrate on the beautiful rock and not where I was going and how I was going to get back.

One of Our Favorites Hikes

That’s me in the red on the unmaintained section of the hike.

Giving credit where credit is due

Most of the images are from my cousins and friends that I hiked with. My concentration on not falling distracted me from taking pictures. Thank you M, E, L, and H for your great shots and for letting me share them on my blog.

I’m a little late posting

I went on a hike. It was for my birthday. It was on one of my favorite trail with my cousins and two friends, M, E, L, and H. Poamoho trail is a ridge trail 3.5 miles to the Ko’olau summit. It is a permitted hike, with 5 people per permit; the trail is only open 4 days a week. This is one of the reasons that it is such a memorable hike. And because we hiked on Monday, we were the only people on the trail. Besides our voices, the sounds of the birds and Poamoho stream below were loud and clear.

At one of the fixed slide areas

We haven’t been to Poamoho since October 2020. Because of the pandemic, the trail was closed for a while and then suffered several landslides. All but one of the slides were filled. The DLNR had put up ropes to cross the slide area. I’m always amazed how these washed-out areas get fixed.

Proof of the mud

I’ve been on this trail twice before in the fall. It was much dyer then. Let’s say this trip, the word of the day was mud. Haha. I was concentrating very hard not to fall or get too much on me, but that was a worthless effort, and on the trip back, I just slogged through, becoming the muddiest in the group. The mud won on this trip as we all fell sometime on the trail.

Here are some highlights of our hikes. We were all exhausted at the end but what a great day.

Our Start

Flora

The View

The Cabin

Going to the cabin added half mile each way. The muddy condition made it feel much longer.

Tunnels on the Trail

A week behind, but better late than never. We went on a hike at Waimano Ridge Trail in Pearl City, Hawaii. We went up to the picnic table and back, about a 5-mile round trip. This trail is lusher than others I’ve been on, as the walk is more through the forest than on the ridge of the mountain range.

Early Morning Start: to beat the heat.

The hike is known for the irrigation tunnels and ditches; they brought water from the wet side of the island to the farms on the west side. There are ten tunnels that you can walkthrough. I was a little leery about going through the tunnel. I imagined spiders and other crawly things falling on me. Too much Indiana Jones movies! Haha!

Tunnel One: Waiting at the end for crew

Trails were busy, and there were even campers near the picnic table. A Shama followed us for part of the trail, singing his songs and mimicking our whistles. Here’s a link for more information on the Shama. Wish I got picture but he was too fast for me.

The trail was packed with strawberry guava and mountain apple (also known as malay apple), all still green to pick. We may have to come back soon to harvest some fruit.


Here’s a gallery of the trail. Fun hike, get out early to be the heat and the crowds.