Fav Pic: Arches NP

Haha. This is one of the few pictures Oat took of me that can’t see my double chin or the super roundness of my face. Whenever he took a picture of me, I always said, “make me look skinny.” This one may not be skinny, but it’s much better than most others.

Going through these photos has me dreaming of a vacation, like one’s Oat and I took many years ago. Covid has stopped my adventuring for a while.

One of many arches to see.

My Arches trip was in 2009, part of a triple park tour: Yellowstone, Grand Teton, and Arches. There was lots of driving, beautiful mountains, and an abundance of wildlife. The parks were great, but the rock formations at Arches were spectacular. Making me want to go and visit again.

What I would do differently

Don’t go to Moab in July, too hot. There is so much to do outside but visiting in the middle of summer wasn’t the best idea. We went out by six, explored for lunch, and spent the afternoon resting in the ac of the hotel room. In the late afternoon, we would go out for more exploring and dinner. Not a bad use of time, but I would like to be out on the trail between 7-8 and come back to the room around 4ish to relax and shower before dinner.


Spend more time in the area. A two-week triple park tour was not enough time to explore Moab. Next time, I’ll want to spend at least a week in Arches the places we didn’t have to see on my last trip.

Be brave. I’m not really afraid of height but on this trip, heights seem to bother me. I was a bit apprehensive when scrambling over the large boulders. And the slopping area by the slopping made me very nervous, that I didn’t walk up to it. I did feel very disappointed. I hope on my next trip I will be able to summon up the courage to do it.

The Delicate Arch from afar

What I would do again

I most definitely would do the Fiery Furnace guided hike with park ranger again. We hike through narrow canyons and scrambled over boulders with the ranger leading the way and pointing out the interesting rock formations and the hows and whys they were formed. I also really like being lead so I could concentrate on the beautiful rock and not where I was going and how I was going to get back.

One of Our Favorites Hikes

That’s me in the red on the unmaintained section of the hike.

Giving credit where credit is due

Most of the images are from my cousins and friends that I hiked with. My concentration on not falling distracted me from taking pictures. Thank you M, E, L, and H for your great shots and for letting me share them on my blog.

I’m a little late posting

I went on a hike. It was for my birthday. It was on one of my favorite trail with my cousins and two friends, M, E, L, and H. Poamoho trail is a ridge trail 3.5 miles to the Ko’olau summit. It is a permitted hike, with 5 people per permit; the trail is only open 4 days a week. This is one of the reasons that it is such a memorable hike. And because we hiked on Monday, we were the only people on the trail. Besides our voices, the sounds of the birds and Poamoho stream below were loud and clear.

At one of the fixed slide areas

We haven’t been to Poamoho since October 2020. Because of the pandemic, the trail was closed for a while and then suffered several landslides. All but one of the slides were filled. The DLNR had put up ropes to cross the slide area. I’m always amazed how these washed-out areas get fixed.

Proof of the mud

I’ve been on this trail twice before in the fall. It was much dyer then. Let’s say this trip, the word of the day was mud. Haha. I was concentrating very hard not to fall or get too much on me, but that was a worthless effort, and on the trip back, I just slogged through, becoming the muddiest in the group. The mud won on this trip as we all fell sometime on the trail.

Here are some highlights of our hikes. We were all exhausted at the end but what a great day.

Our Start

Flora

The View

The Cabin

Going to the cabin added half mile each way. The muddy condition made it feel much longer.

Tunnels on the Trail

A week behind, but better late than never. We went on a hike at Waimano Ridge Trail in Pearl City, Hawaii. We went up to the picnic table and back, about a 5-mile round trip. This trail is lusher than others I’ve been on, as the walk is more through the forest than on the ridge of the mountain range.

Early Morning Start: to beat the heat.

The hike is known for the irrigation tunnels and ditches; they brought water from the wet side of the island to the farms on the west side. There are ten tunnels that you can walkthrough. I was a little leery about going through the tunnel. I imagined spiders and other crawly things falling on me. Too much Indiana Jones movies! Haha!

Tunnel One: Waiting at the end for crew

Trails were busy, and there were even campers near the picnic table. A Shama followed us for part of the trail, singing his songs and mimicking our whistles. Here’s a link for more information on the Shama. Wish I got picture but he was too fast for me.

The trail was packed with strawberry guava and mountain apple (also known as malay apple), all still green to pick. We may have to come back soon to harvest some fruit.


Here’s a gallery of the trail. Fun hike, get out early to be the heat and the crowds.

Hiking: Kuaokala Trail

At the trailhead

Another wet and windy hike in the books, Kuaokala Trail. The forecast was to be scattered showers with gusty winds. As we entered Waianae, it started to pour. But we decided it would passing, and by the time we get to the trailhead, it would be clear.

A little bit of sunshine

Kuaokala is a permitted hike because the hike is on military land. To get the trailhead, you enter at Kaena point Satellite Tracking Station. Besides the permit, you will need ids for everyone in the car. The military police let you in through the three gates. You will need to call them on using call box if they are not around.

View of Makua Valley

The weather turned not in our favorite as it became more wet and windy as we hiked. It made parts of the trail slippery and our views obstructed by clouds and rain. But I did managed to catch a few shot when the sun peaked out.

gusty winds on the ridge
going over the red boulders
The crew during a break in from the rain. Cousin “E, “T”, “J”, and “L”
“L” amongst the red boulder
“J” and “T” making good use of fencing

This trail was worth going on wet and windy day. The rain made it a little tougher but it was great to get out amongst the trees.

Hiking: Poamoho Trail

Hiking this trail isn’t easy to come by. It’s a permitted trail, only allowing hikers and hunters on the weekends and federal holidays. The permit enables five people and one 4-wheel drive vehicle. It’s a 45-minute slow drive up a rutted (if it’s been raining, muddy) road. But once you arrive, it is all worth the effort.

My effort was very minimal as I was one of the five that didn’t have to apply for the permit or drive the truck. All I needed to do was to arrive at the meeting places at a reasonable hour (7:00). I’m a lucky girl (really an old lady). Haha.

Beautiful day for a hike

Our group of five hiking friends that met through my cousin, “E.” There was “L,” “J,” “R,” “E,” and myself. Pretty well paired with each other as hiking ability goes. Several of them have excellent knowledge of fauna and birds on the trail. Always nice to have that on a hike.

The trailhead

The weather was beautiful; winds picked up from earlier in the week. Sunny, with a minimal amount of clouds. It had been dry the previous days before making the mud at a minimum.

The trailhead looked different because of the tall grasses surrounding the sign. Hiker “L” heard the trail upkeep might be lacking because of the quarantine. Grasses were tall but still walkable.

It has been at least two years since I last hiked the trail. It was a similar type of day; dry and sunny. I’m happy because of the stories I’ve heard slipping, sliding, and walking out mud up to mid-calf doesn’t sound like fun.

On the way up, we were met with a brisk breeze around every corner, making corners something to look forward to. The trail was narrow, on foot in front of the other in places. Making it a good workout on our balance.

Much of the Strawberry guava was past it’s prime. The fruit flies were swarming in those areas (needed to breathe through our nose or get a mouthful). And where there wasn’t guava, there were ferns. I’m not sure what type of fern, but a sturdy variety as it saved me from falling into the mud.

Once you reach the summit, you understand why this is one of the beautiful hikes in Hawaii. You can see all the way to the east side beaches. On this day, the breeze was more than a breeze but a Pali Lookout style winds.

We had our rest and back on the trail. It was as comfortable as the morning as the sun had risen high in the sky. Turning the corners, we were not greeted with a gust of wind. But we made our way to the last bench for orange slices and the last of the water to get us out to our truck.

We all feel accomplished finishing the 7 miles and dreaming of our next hike together.