Hello! It’s been a month . . .

I haven’t been feeling up to writing, and I haven’t been taking pictures. Could this be due to the COVID? Hmmm. The numbers have been very high in Hawaii, keeping me close to home for the sake of my parents and myself. The three of us have gotten our vaccinations, but it seems to be better safe than sorry with this new Delta variant.

crochet leaves for Joyful Return—Recover

I wanted to share this little side project I’ve been crocheting. It’s for a HOMA (Honolulu Museum of Art) exhibit, Joyful Return—Recover. They asked for handmade ʻōhiʻa leaves in crochet, knit, or sewn for use in this exhibit.

ʻŌhia Lehua, a beautiful native plant, is suffering the plight of rapid ʻōhiʻa death—killing millions of trees across the island. It is a fungal infection that once the trees are infected, they die, and there is no cure.

ʻōhiʻa from the trail

This plight makes me sad as the mighty ʻōhiʻa is one of the plants we see on the many hiking trails in Hawaii. We find them perched on the sides of the mountains trails, standing firm in the winds.

From wind sweep trail of Palehua

This community-based project creates fiber installations around the museum to bring awareness to the ʻōhiʻa’s plight and its recovery. It uses the handmade leaves from the community and pompom ʻōhiʻa to transform the space into an ʻōhiʻa lehua forest. Here’s the link to the Joyful Return Exhibit at HOMA: https://honolulumuseum.org/current_exhibitions/joyful-return/

I hoped to crochet more than I have. But my giant blanket project got in away. Hope this helps fill out their ʻōhiʻa forest. For more information on the ʻōhiʻa lehua, here’s a link to article: https://www.hawaiimagazine.com/5-things-you-need-to-know-about-the-ohia-lehua-flower/

My watercolor/embroidery of the beautiful ʻōhiʻa

Showing off

Woo hoo! I can’t believe I finished my Scheepjes CAL 2020 d’Historie Naturelle. This pattern was the most complicated piece I have done so far. I learned so many new stitches and new techniques. I’m so thankful I had that moment in my life that I thought I could make this blanket.

All done. 8/23/2021 As wide as queen size bed

Thank you, Christina Hadderingh of A Spoonful of Yarn , for your fantastic design. I don’t know who you came up with this design, but I’m so glad you did.

And oh my goodness, I don’t know what I would have done without Esther Dijkstra of It’s all in a Nutshell blog videos to get me through the entire piece, especially the lacy corner sections. Your voice (extremely calm) and helpful hints as if you knew where I would be struggling.

My blanket is nowhere close to perfect, but I don’t care. I think it looks great. Sometimes you have to say yes to a challenge.

Row 97

Yes, I’m still slogging away at my Scheepjes CAL 2020 blanket. I’m on row 97 out of 105. I probably wouldn’t call it “slog” if I wasn’t crocheting a blanket in the hottest part of summer. I see the end coming soon and have been pushing to finish each row I work.

This is row 97 of my CAL 2020 blanket.

D’ Histoire Naturelle is the most challenging pattern I have crocheted. I’ve learned many new stitch patterns and techniques. I was close to quitting around February, took a two-month break. And I was able to tackle what I perceived as the most complicated section.

I took a few pictures of myself working the current new stitch–pearl stitch. I could see using it as edging. Pretty cute. Oh, by the way, please excuse the shots. I should invest in a tripod if I’m going to continue to do these types of images.


I’m shooting for the end of August to finish the blanket. I have eight more rows to go and MANY ends to weave in.

Row 80 out of 105

Phew! I’m on row 80 of my Scheepjes CAL.

Row 80: Two sides done, 2 more to go. It’s as wide as my double bed with 25 rows to gow.

Part 5 has been harder than the dreaded part 4 (lacy corners). Could it be the repetitiveness of these rows or is it that I’m not paying attention. Whatever it is, there has been lots of adding rows, counting, cursing, and ripping out, repeat.

I guess I need some encouragement to get me to the end. This is what the blanket look like so far. It’s much bigger than I thought it would be.

A project from my queue

I started this a while ago, sometime during the pandemic. It’s this pillowcase I made with vintage Japanese fabric a long time back. It has begun to fray. I took off with the intent to patch the fraying pieces with some new material. Then I happened upon several articles and videos on boro.

Boro in Japanese means ragged or tattered. I grew up with the term boro-boro when you wore clothing that was falling apart. Boro is a style of patchwork using old cloth and sashiko (running stitch). Here’s a link to an article I found on boro. That goes into more detail. I love that some of these boro pieces are generational and turn into something new again. The graphical quality and direction that the stitches add to the patches are what I like about boro.

I decide to use this pillowcase as a sampler of different stitches and applique to find something I like. Maybe come up with my style. I also wanted to test out if I like hand-stitching.

I started off doing the basic running stitch, learning how to get my length consistent and find a size I like. I purchase sashiko thread and needles (sidebar: I’m a sucker great packaging and the packaging on these needle are great)from Amazon. I got the traditional off-white color. I do have a bunch of different embroidery threads that I could use also.

This is where I started. Working it as a sampler to teach me about boro and sashiko.

I stopped and hung it on the wall for a long while as I worked on my many other project sitting in my queue. I think I got tried of stitching and not sure where I was going. Then just this week I picked it up wanting to start stitching again. I think I’m seeing it more than a sampler. I might have to make a new pillowcase.

Here’s where I’m at. I know it isn’t finished. I hope I’ll know when it will be.