The Art of Sharing

Ever wonder about the high cost of food and how people deal with it. In Hawaii, it’s more significant as food and goods not available on the islands come in from the mainland. I try and buy locally and just enough for a week or two to eliminate food waste in our house. In my three years back on the island, I notice this is one of the most significant ways we deal with the high cost is sharing our food.

Just this week, I get a call from my cousin “M” and if we wanted a soursop. Of course, it’s a yes. It’s Mom’s favorite. Right before she hangs up, I ask if she wants kale.

Soursop chilling in the refrigerator

“Sure!” she replies.

And the cycle repeats itself many times over in many Hawaii households. To me, this is the art of sharing. 

What’s a soursap?

I realized I may have never described what a soursop was like. This is because I haven’t tried it. Green gnarly fruit kind of scare me since being introduce to durian (Southeast Asia’s beloved fruit). On first meeting, soursop looks like a relative of durian–big, green, and knobby. But it doesn’t smell.

The inside is creamy white with large black seeds with no bad smell. My cousin recommends to put it in the freezer for a refreshing snack.

Another sharing moment

Guava trees are fruiting now. Trees brought to the house by the birds that my mom feed every morning. Fruit are slightly larger than a golf ball. First three guava wen to the bird (not intentional), got the next three. Beautifully pink inside.