I forgot to add a cover . . .

Back in August, I posted about my staycation with my girlfriends, and I had everyone send me their photos, and I would put together a book for everyone. I forgot to add a cover in my excitement to submit the book.


I had 11 coverless books and was not sure what to do. Many ideas ran through my head, and none of them sounded like a solution. And I decided to put it away till something came to me. Fast forward four months, and I have an idea. I would make patchwork covers that could be slipped on. I got the idea because I was getting together with the girls the coming Sunday, two days away! Yes, I procrastinated. I feel like I’m still in high school.

The Prototype

I wanted to make the cover colorful and fun, like the interior. I thought a vintage flower print and purple Hawaiian print would make a great combination. The vintage print was large triangular scraps. That drove the layout of the fabric. I needed to make sure I had enough for all the covers, and I was trying to keep them similar to keep the production time done.


Once the covers were cut, I decided to sashiko stitch (Japanese embroidery) to attach the two fabrics only on the pink fabric. I came up with a pattern to do two rows of stitching around the pink shapes. I decided the front cover would slip into the book cover pockets. I made pockets for both spine and the right edge of the cover. I initially wanted to glue the covers to the book, but I didn’t know how the paper would react to the glue, and I had no time to test. I stitched the sides of the pocket with kind of a wrapping stitch (not sure what it is really called) that I’ve seen on Instagram.


Well, I didn’t make my deadline of having it done by our brunch. I had two done for the girls who live in town, and the rest would get it delivered. But we ended up spending the afternoon on my girlfriend’s patio talking, and I was able to make up six more.

The last three are done and out for hand delivery today.

I enjoyed the hand stitching patchwork part of this project and have started another stitching project with leftover scraps. I will post when I’m done with what I made.

Marling?

I saw a post from Modern Daily Knitting about marling; the image intrigued me, and I made a mental note to go back to look at it. Well, several days later I couldn’t find it. So I googled Marling and found a post about marling on Tin Can Knits and a quick and easy hat pattern to try out the technique.

4 strands for my Snap hat

Marling is knitting holding 2 or more different strands of yarn to create a speckled fabric. I tried out his technique with mostly the same weight of yarn I had in my stash. I knew I wanted to do something with an ombre and decided to get the Snap hat pattern to try out this technique. I’ve been looking for a quick pattern during my rest periods between sections from my Shawlography Westknits MKAL 2021. Haha.

Here’s what I got. One of the benefits of this marling project is I got to use yarn from my stash, and it turns sock and lace weight yarn into bulky to make knitting up the hat a quick and very satisfying project.

For my marling project, the colors I started with were navy, teal, pink, and variegated yarn.

Most of the yarn I got from Savers, only the variegated yarn, was from my yarn gift from a friend who was getting rid of most of her stash. My plan was to do an ombre from dark to light. The pattern said to change the one yarn every 4-6 rows to create the ombre.

Switched out the navy with gray

After 6 more rows, I switched out the teal with medium magenta. I continued with this colorway till the decrease section. Then I swapped out the variegated yarn with another strand of pink.


Ta-Dah! My finished Snap hat with a big fluffy pom-pom in all 6 colors. Love the way the ombre turned out. I would love to make a blanket with this technique. I’ll just add it to my to-do project list and look out for a colorful sock or lace yarn sale.

Fav Pics: My Photogenic Geranium

Back in New Jersey, I had gangly geranium that was started from seed. My mom sprinkled seeds in a pot on one of her spring visits and to my surprise, I found a little seeding near the end of summer. Growing inside during the winter, gave its gangly-ness due to the filtered winter light. But for all its legginess, it produced the most beautiful blossoms. They look like cherry blossoms.

I just started a plant from the seeds from this geranium here in Hawaii. The blossoms aren’t as beautiful but I’m giving it time to come into its own.

On a Whim

This took me a while to write up. I haven’t been in the mood to post. I hope to feel inspired to post more regularly–phf

During my girl’s zoom meeting, I mentioned that I wanted to see the eruption at Kilauea Volcano. Thinking no one would be interested, “J” said she would go with me to my surprise. Three weeks later, four more people, including one husband, were off to Hawaii Island for a two-day visit.

With no solid plan, only to see Kilauea at night, we started the day off meeting at Ken’s House of Pancake for breakfast and a planning session. Ken’s is a Hilo landmark, close to the airport, great to start the trip with a good breakfast.

After our breakfast and planning session, we were off to the Bayfront area to check out the farmers market and the shops. My list from mom was avocados, fishcake, and anything else that’s good.

Under the pavilion, full of beautiful produce from Hawaii Island

The produce farmers market is under a pavilion, and across the street is the craft section. Here are a few things I picked up there.

After an afternoon of roaming, we made our way to KTA supermarket to pick up some dinner and snacks for the evening adventure to Kilauea volcano. Then off to evening accommodation at a friend’s Airbnb. It’s a two-bedroom guesthouse in Kurtistown halfway between Volcano and Hilo. There were animals on the property to distract us from unpacking: a steer called Red, a horse (I forgot his name), Pluto the goat, two shy cats, and many feral chickens.

After a quick snack, we were off to Volcano National Park to start our adventure to see the current eruptions. With a quick pit stop at the visitor center, we follow the line of cars to the end of the road to Uekahuna. It was a little past sunset, and the sky had cleared to present us with beautiful blues and oranges.

Beautiful remnants of the sunset

From this vantage point, we could see the orange glow of the eruption. It was just beyond the cliff. It had turned cold, I forgot my rain jacket to block the wind. Luckily I was smart enough to bring my shawl and I used it as a head/neck scarf to keep me warm.

The Glow


The skies cleared to present us with a beautiful show of stars and planets. Several of my friends were using an app to identify the stars. In our stargazing, we caught the attention of a friendly man that helped us identify more stars then pointed to the people on the other side of the Halema’uma’u Crater. He told us that you needed to hike into the viewing point. He said 3/4 of a mile from the parking area 3/4 mile to the viewing point (I think most of my friends only heard 3/4 of a mile). We all agreed it was doable and off we went to our next adventure. (Thank you to “C” for bringing all of her torches as I forgot mine back at the Airbnb)

This view started our stargazing

The almost full lighted our way to the viewing area. The park rangers did a great job at directing us and the hundreds of others making our way to see the lava flow. Once we got there, it was pretty amazing. I didn’t expect the flow to be so steady.

The Flow. My lowly S10 does not do it justice.

It was a pretty magical night. The skies cleared for a beautiful starry sky, there was an almost full moon rise, and Madame Pele’s show was spectacular. What more could I ask for. Sometimes it’s good to say out loud what you want to do. It may just happen.

Here I am, on the walk back to the car, happy I came to see Madame Pele’s beautiful show. You can see the almost full moon behind me.